Buzzing about Bee Health in Binghampton

Thursday, June 30, 2016
By: Dr. Becky Langer, Bayer North American Bee Care Program, Project Manager
Bayer Carpenter Art Garden donation in Memphis


Summer break for most kids usually means long days full of time by the pool, relaxation and zero thoughts of school. One group of Memphis students, however, was buzzing with excitement to learn more about an enterprising insect that works particularly hard each summer – the honey bee.


Future Bee Health Advocates

Earlier this summer, we visited the open summer art class at the Binghampton Development Corporation’s Carpenter Art Garden. The students participated in a hands-on lesson about bee health, pollination and how Students crafting at Carpenter Art Garden eventthey can play a role in helping these hardworking agricultural allies. This included various crafts intended to help bees, such as painting flower pots and decorating full-size hive boxes, which were later auctioned off to benefit Agricenter’s Feast on the Farm silent auction. As our Feed a Bee partner, Agricenter has also committed to dedicate a plot to plant forage for honey bees in their area.


Every Bit Helps!

I was fortunate to have the opportunity to speak at this community event and explain the importance of bees and other pollinators in growing some of our favorite snacks, like apples, avocados, strawberries and nuts. While the children decorated their flower pots, we encouraged them to plant pollinator-attractant flowers in their backyards with the seeds provided, in order to help provide food for our tiny but hardworking friends. The children were very excited to learn more about the big role that such small worker bees play every day in their community.


Dr. Becky Langer-Curry Feed a Bee donation in MemphisCaring for Our Friends This Fall

Bayer’s Bee Care Program also presented the nonprofit with a $5,000 donation to support this foraging initiative on a larger scale. It will be used to establish additional pollinator patches at Carpenter Art Garden this fall. These new plants will help the insects the garden relies on to pollinate its fruits and vegetables, which are grown onsite for the local community.


There are few things more rewarding than sharing more information about something I’m passionate about – pollinator health – to the next generation of bee health advocates.


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